Gitignore: Excluding Everything Except a Specific Directory

I have the following directory structure:

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$ tree -aF src/
src/
├── github.com/
│   ├── git/
│   │   └── git/
│   │   └── file
│   └── realguess/
│   ├── git/
│   │   └── file
│   └── hello/
│   └── hello.go
└── .gitignore
6 directories, 4 files

My intention is to keep the projects in src/github.com/realguess/ only. So, I have added the following gitignore file:

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$ cat src/.gitignore
/github.com/
!/github.com/realguess/

But the directory is ignored:

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$ git check-ignore -v github.com/realguess/
src/.gitignore:1:/github.com/ github.com/realguess/

It is not possible to re-include a file if a parent directory of that file is excluded. Git doesn’t list excluded directories for performance reasons, so any patterns on contained files have no effect, no matter where they are defined.[^1]

Uh-oh! The directory github.com/ is excluded. Therefore, it is not possible to re-include a file github.com/realguess (directory is a file). To fix it, just need to add the wildcard to the end of the parent directory:

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$ cat src/.gitignore
/github.com/*
!/github.com/realguess/

By adding the wildcard character, it matches every file (including hidden ones) or directory under github.com/ directory, the directory itself as the parent of github.com/realguess/ is not excluded. Then, we use the negation pattern to re-include github.com/realguess/.

Double check it:

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$ git check-ignore -v github.com/realguess/
1

The debugging command returns non-zero status code, which indicates that the directory is not ignored.

Registering a Domain with Amazon Route 53 via CLI

Register a domain with Amazon Route 53 via CLI is very straightforward, the only complicate thing is to generate the acceptable JSON structure, then somehow enter the JSON string in the command line without meddling from the shell.

The command is:

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$ aws route53domains register-domain

The documentation can be found from the AWS CLI Command Reference or issuing:

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$ aws route53domains register-domain help

Most the command line options require simple string values, but some options like --admin-contact requires a structure data, which is complex to enter in the command line. The easiest way is to forget all other options and use --cli-input-json to get everything in JSON.

First let’s generate the skeleton or template to use:

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$ aws route53domains register-domain --generate-cli-skeleton

That should output something like:

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{
"DomainName": "",
"IdnLangCode": "",
"DurationInYears": 0,
"AutoRenew": true,
"AdminContact": {
"FirstName": "",
"LastName": "",
"ContactType": "",
"OrganizationName": "",
"AddressLine1": "",
"AddressLine2": "",
"City": "",
"State": "",
"CountryCode": "",
"ZipCode": "",
"PhoneNumber": "",
"Email": "",
"Fax": "",
"ExtraParams": [
{
"Name": "",
"Value": ""
}
]
},
"RegistrantContact": {
"FirstName": "",
"LastName": "",
"ContactType": "",
"OrganizationName": "",
"AddressLine1": "",
"AddressLine2": "",
"City": "",
"State": "",
"CountryCode": "",
"ZipCode": "",
"PhoneNumber": "",
"Email": "",
"Fax": "",
"ExtraParams": [
{
"Name": "",
"Value": ""
}
]
},
"TechContact": {
"FirstName": "",
"LastName": "",
"ContactType": "",
"OrganizationName": "",
"AddressLine1": "",
"AddressLine2": "",
"City": "",
"State": "",
"CountryCode": "",
"ZipCode": "",
"PhoneNumber": "",
"Email": "",
"Fax": "",
"ExtraParams": [
{
"Name": "",
"Value": ""
}
]
},
"PrivacyProtectAdminContact": true,
"PrivacyProtectRegistrantContact": true,
"PrivacyProtectTechContact": true
}

Fill in the fields, leave out the ones not needed:

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{
"DomainName": "example.com",
"DurationInYears": 1,
"AutoRenew": true,
"AdminContact": {
"FirstName": "Joe",
"LastName": "Doe",
"ContactType": "PERSON",
"AddressLine1": "101 Main St",
"City": "New York",
"State": "NY",
"CountryCode": "US",
"ZipCode": "10001",
"PhoneNumber": "+1.8888888888",
"Email": "[email protected]"
},
"RegistrantContact": {
"FirstName": "Joe",
"LastName": "Doe",
"ContactType": "PERSON",
"AddressLine1": "101 Main St",
"City": "New York",
"State": "NY",
"CountryCode": "US",
"ZipCode": "10001",
"PhoneNumber": "+1.8888888888",
"Email": "[email protected]"
},
"TechContact": {
"FirstName": "Joe",
"LastName": "Doe",
"ContactType": "PERSON",
"AddressLine1": "101 Main St",
"City": "New York",
"State": "NY",
"CountryCode": "US",
"ZipCode": "10001",
"PhoneNumber": "+1.8888888888",
"Email": "[email protected]"
},
"PrivacyProtectAdminContact": true,
"PrivacyProtectRegistrantContact": true,
"PrivacyProtectTechContact": true
}

Now let’s register by running through jq to clean up extra blanks and end of line characters, and then pipe to xargs command by using new line character as the delimiter instead of a blank by default:

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$ cat input.json | jq -cM . | \
xargs -d '\n' aws route53domains register-domain --cli-input-json
{
"OperationId": "00000000-0000-0000-0000-00000000000"
}

Dockerizing Redmine

Migrate an existing Redmine application into a Docker based container. There are two main steps:

  1. Migrate MySQL database
  2. Migrate Redmine application

MySQL

Create an archive from the source data directory, where data to be migrated:

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$ sudo tar -C /var/lib/mysql -czf ~/mysql.tar.gz .

The directory /var/lib/mysql is the default location where all database related data are stored.

Download the archive:

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$ scp example.com:~/mysql.tar.gz .

Extract to the directory where we will map the host volume to the guest:

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$ sudo mkdir -p /srv/mysql && sudo tar -C $_ -xzf mysql.tar.gz

Download the latest (5.7.16 make sure it is the latest, because 8.x branch might not work) MySQL Docker image:

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$ docker pull mysql && docker pull mysql:5.7.16

Run a MySQL container with the data directory mounted from the host:

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$ docker run \
--detach \
--name mysql \
--restart always \
--volume /srv/mysql:/var/lib/mysql \
mysql

Environment variables (MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD, MYSQL_DATABASE, MYSQL_USER, or MYSQL_PASSWORD) become unnecessary:

Do note that none of the variables below will have any effect if you start the container with a data directory that already contains a database: any pre-existing database will always be left untouched on container startup.[^1]

Now I should be able to access my existing database:

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$ docker exec -it mysql sh -c 'mysql -uredmine -p redmine'
Enter password:
Reading table information for completion of table and column names
You can turn off this feature to get a quicker startup with -A
Welcome to the MySQL monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 5
Server version: 5.7.16 MySQL Community Server (GPL)
Copyright (c) 2000, 2016, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.
Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.
mysql>

But when accessing MySQL database from another host, we have to update the permissions. Let’s log into MySQL with root user:

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$ docker exec -it mysql sh -c 'mysql -uroot -p mysql'

Issue SQL commands:

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mysql> SELECT Host, User FROM db WHERE Db='redmine';
+-----------+---------+
| Host | User |
+-----------+---------+
| localhost | redmine |
+-----------+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
mysql> SELECT Host, User FROM user WHERE User='redmine';
+-----------+---------+
| host | user |
+-----------+---------+
| localhost | redmine |
+-----------+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Only localhost is allowed for both the database and the user. This is problematic. How does one know the host of the container yet to be created? The easiest way is to allow access from all hosts:

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mysql> UPDATE db SET Host='%' WHERE Db='redmine';
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)
Rows matched: 1 Changed: 1 Warnings: 0
mysql> UPDATE user SET Host='%' WHERE User='redmine';
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1 Changed: 1 Warnings: 0

We can restrict to a set of IP addresses such as 172.17.0.% or sub domains %.example.com. Docker networking uses 172.17.0.x range.

The better way is that when linking containers, should be able to update mysql container /etc/hosts file to include a redmine container field. Then, a wild card is not necessary.

But having to allow all hosts to connect is fine, because all hosts do not mean all hosts. The port is not bind or map to any open port in the host machine. Only the host (172.17.0.1) and other Docker containers inside the host can discover the service provided. Other machines or containers outside the host is not able to access at all.

Restart the container to have the update taking effect:

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$ docker restart mysql

Redmine

For a basic Redmine setup, there aren’t much to migrate, mainly just three directories, config, files, and log, others are application data. Configuration could be done via environment variables, and if logs weren’t important to migrate, we just need to move the files directory, which is used for file upload.

A CLI Method to Check SSL Certificate Expiration Date

I know that browser does this automatically, but it might come in handy if you need to check the expiration date of a SSL certificate through CLI. The key is openssl, OpenSSL command line tool.

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$ echo | openssl s_client -connect example.com:443 2> /dev/null | \
openssl x509 -noout -enddate
notAfter=Nov 28 12:00:00 2018 GMT

The command is consisted of two parts:

  • Retrieve SSL certificate from the server
  • Extract the expiration date data

The openssl program is a command line tool for using the various cryptography functions of OpenSSL’s crypto library from the shell. It can be used for[^1]

  • Creation and management of private keys, public keys and parameters
  • Public key cryptographic operations
  • Creation of X.509 certificates, CSRs and CRLs
  • Calculation of Message Digests
  • Encryption and Decryption with Ciphers
  • SSL/TLS Client and Server Tests
  • Handling of S/MIME signed or encrypted mail
  • Time Stamp requests, generation and verification

What we need here is to perform SSL/TLS Client and Server Tests.

s_client is one of the standard commands of openssl command line tool:

This implements a generic SSL/TLS client which can establish a transparent connection to a remote server speaking SSL/TLS. It’s intended for testing purposes only and provides only rudimentary interface functionality but internally uses mostly all functionality of the OpenSSL ssl library.[^1]

Dig deeper into s_client command:

The s_client command implements a generic SSL/TLS client which connects to a remote host using SSL/TLS. It is a very useful diagnostic tool for SSL servers.[^2]

Option -connect host:port:

This specifies the host and optional port to connect to. If not specified then an attempt is made to connect to the local host on port 4433.[^2]

And the format is:

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$ openssl s_client -connect servername:443 > data

If a connection is established, openssl enters interactive mode:

If a connection is established with an SSL server then any data received from the server is displayed and any key presses will be sent to the server. When used interactively (which means neither -quiet nor -ign_eof have been given), the session will be renegotiated if the line begins with an R, and if the line begins with a Q or if end of file is reached, the connection will be closed down.[^2]

To quit, type Q or <ctr>+d (EOF).

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$ openssl s_client -connect example.com:443 > /tmp/example.com
depth=1 C = US, O = DigiCert Inc, OU = www.digicert.com, CN = DigiCert SHA2 High Assurance
Server CA
verify error:num=20:unable to get local issuer certificate
verify return:0
Q
DONE

Dump the session data:

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$ cat /tmp/example.com
CONNECTED(00000003)
---
Certificate chain
0 s:/C=US/ST=California/L=Los Angeles/O=Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers/OU=Technology/CN=www.example.org
i:/C=US/O=DigiCert Inc/OU=www.digicert.com/CN=DigiCert SHA2 High Assurance Server CA
1 s:/C=US/O=DigiCert Inc/OU=www.digicert.com/CN=DigiCert SHA2 High Assurance Server CA
i:/C=US/O=DigiCert Inc/OU=www.digicert.com/CN=DigiCert High Assurance EV Root CA
---
Server certificate
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----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-----END CERTIFICATE-----
subject=/C=US/ST=California/L=Los Angeles/O=Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers/OU=Technology/CN=www.example.org
issuer=/C=US/O=DigiCert Inc/OU=www.digicert.com/CN=DigiCert SHA2 High Assurance Server CA ---
No client certificate CA names sent
---
SSL handshake has read 3393 bytes and written 421 bytes
---
New, TLSv1/SSLv3, Cipher is ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
Server public key is 2048 bit
Secure Renegotiation IS supported
Compression: NONE
Expansion: NONE
SSL-Session:
Protocol : TLSv1.2
Cipher : ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
Session-ID: C828441A824CE7B0F6A74BBE890AB23727445EAE8521E19F438E679C39E969B1
Session-ID-ctx:
Master-Key: 38BE4F754FBCB5F41650AD91AA5588ACD88B75D7939487052D9FD2790476E7C6D2512A6451A3FC102958488BF173CB54
Key-Arg : None
PSK identity: None
PSK identity hint: None
SRP username: None
TLS session ticket lifetime hint: 300 (seconds)
TLS session ticket:
0000 - 83 70 c4 28 23 ee 9c 9e-87 1b 96 bf 44 76 ee d3 .p.(#.......Dv..
0010 - 45 c9 be ee a5 c5 42 49-c9 08 35 10 ba 79 03 b4 E.....BI..5..y..
0020 - 46 99 9a f2 d3 7b b5 f2-ad 9e 10 5c 7a 61 c3 0e F....{.....\za..
0030 - e0 09 aa 7a 5e 2a 2e bb-42 6a 08 18 16 ae 56 66 ...z^*..Bj....Vf
0040 - 11 0c 96 1a 4a 20 9f 50-6d f7 e2 53 00 75 6f 07 ....J .Pm..S.uo.
0050 - 7f 94 bf 4a 5f e1 f6 3b-d5 b7 6c 11 bc 33 7b 10 ...J_..;..l..3{.
0060 - 78 e3 81 a0 0b 83 25 d6-e6 a5 64 90 59 24 a6 e9 x.....%...d.Y$..
0070 - 9b b6 4b be 9e 42 1b 03-e0 d7 76 e9 32 87 3e 0d ..K..B....v.2.>.
0080 - 3d 09 09 32 18 fd 04 63-93 fe 33 9f 47 50 d4 c1 =..2...c..3.GP..
0090 - e1 a9 21 cc 67 30 ea 03-7f c1 ee 2a 54 02 c8 11 ..!.g0.....*T...
Start Time: 1475971200
Timeout : 300 (sec)
Verify return code: 20 (unable to get local issuer certificate)
---

To avoid the interactive mode, we can pipe an empty string into the command:

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$ echo | openssl s_client -connect example.com:443 > /tmp/example.com 2> /dev/null

Now we have retrieved the SSL certificate from the server. Next, extract the expiration date. This is done by using the standard command x509:

Renewing Let's Encrypt SSL Certificate with Docker

Let’s Encrypt CA issues short-lived certificates (90 days). Automated renewal process is preferred, recommended, and encouraged. But in a few situations, automated process is not available, here is how to do it manually when SSL certificate was installed with Docker:

First, update the container to the latest version. The latest version can be found from the release page in GitHub.

The latest is v0.9.1:

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$ docker pull quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:v0.9.1

Turn off application (if running as a Docker container) to free up the HTTPS port 443:

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$ docker stop app

Renew the certificate by issuing renew command:

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$ docker run -it --rm -p 443:443 --name certbot \
-v /etc/letsencrypt:/etc/letsencrypt \
-v /var/log/letsencrypt:/var/log/letsencrypt \
quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:v0.9.1 renew
Saving debug log to /var/log/letsencrypt/letsencrypt.log
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Processing /etc/letsencrypt/renewal/example.com.conf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cert is due for renewal, auto-renewing...
Starting new HTTPS connection (1): acme-v01.api.letsencrypt.org
Renewing an existing certificate
Performing the following challenges:
tls-sni-01 challenge for example.com
Waiting for verification...
Cleaning up challenges
Generating key (2048 bits): /etc/letsencrypt/keys/0001_key-certbot.pem
Creating CSR: /etc/letsencrypt/csr/0001_csr-certbot.pem
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
new certificate deployed without reload, fullchain is
/etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/fullchain.pem
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Congratulations, all renewals succeeded. The following certs have been renewed:
/etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/fullchain.pem (success)

Restart app (it’s start not restart):

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$ docker start app

Check the expiration date:

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$ echo | openssl s_client -connect example.com:443 2> /dev/null | \
openssl x509 -noout -dates
notBefore=Oct 9 12:00:00 2016 GMT
notAfter=Jan 7 12:00:00 2017 GMT

For more information on renewing, see the Renewing Certificates section from the Certbot documentation.

Settings:

  • Certbot v0.9.1
  • Docker v1.12.1

Getting Let's Encrypt SSL Certificate with Docker

Let’s Encrypt is a free, open, and automated certificate authority (CA). And its Certbot is a fully-featured, extensible client for Let’s Encrypt CA that can automate the tasks of getting, renewing and even installing SSL certificates.

First, you need to get Certbot. There are a few ways to install Certbot. But with Docker, you don’t need to install, you just need to download the Docker image and run the container. However, the caveat is that this method does not install the certificate automatically respecting to your web server. But if you’re like me, running your server in another Docker container, this might be the way to go.

Let’s start.

First, download the image. You can download the latest version (tag):

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$ docker pull quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:latest

But the latest usually is not a stable release:

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$ docker run -it --rm quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:latest --version
certbot 0.10.0.dev0

Therefore, it’s better to use a specific release, which can be found in Certbot’s GitHub page: https://github.com/certbot/certbot/releases.

The latest one now is v0.9.1. We can pull that from Quay.io:

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$ docker pull quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:v0.9.1

Confirm the release version:

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$ docker run -it --rm quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:v0.9.1 --version
certbot 0.9.1

Let’s take a look at the Docker image:

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$ docker inspect quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:v0.9.1

Dropping things don’t care, the output is:

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[
{
"RepoTags": [
"quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:v0.9.1"
],
"ContainerConfig": {
"ExposedPorts": {
"443/tcp": {}
},
"Cmd": [
"/bin/sh",
"-c",
"#(nop) ENTRYPOINT \u0026{[\"certbot\"]}"
],
"Volumes": {
"/etc/letsencrypt": {},
"/var/lib/letsencrypt": {}
},
"Entrypoint": [
"certbot"
]
}
}
]

The ENTRYPOINT is certbot binary:

An ENTRYPOINT allows you to configure a container that will run as an executable.[^1]

And the command line arguments to docker run becomes the arguments to certbot command. As we saw earlier to obtain the release version by using --version.

You can override the ENTRYPOINT instruction using the docker run --entrypoint flag.[^1]

For example, to override and run the container without executing the certbot command:

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$ docker run -it --rm --name certbot --entrypoint /bin/bash \
quay.io/letsencrypt/letsencrypt:v0.9.1

But we are more concerning about others, such as exposed port and mapped volumes. The exposed port is 443, HTTPS port. The most important volume (directory) is /etc/letsencrypt. All generated keys and issued certificates can be found in there. Directory /var/lib/letsencrypt is the default working directory, some backup stuff are stored. I have yet to find it useful. However, the logs directory /var/log/letsencrypt is not being used. This could be useful if things went haywire.

Installing Let's Encrypt SSL Certificate on Google App Engine Using Certbot

Let’s Encrypt is a free, open, and automated certificate authority. And its Certbot is a fully-featured, extensible client for Let’s Encrypt CA that can automate the tasks of getting, renewing and even installing SSL certificates.

Sounds great! However, not yet to be simple and automated, especially working cloud providers such as Google Cloud Platform and its Google App Engine or GAE.

But it’s free. Yes, it’s free. Free software works better. Free certificate authority works better than others.

GAE is a managed service. The place to stored SSL certificate is in separate machines (load balancers). The current automated domain validation by Certbot mostly work with a single machine. Therefore, when the machine issues certificate request is not the same machine to be validated, we need find another way, hopefully an automated method to perform domain validation across machines.

Before creating an automated method, let’s see if we can do it manually. Certbot supports a number of different plugins that can be used to obtain and/or install certificates. A plugin is like an extension that supports a particular web server. Let’s see if we can find a plugin that supports GAE.

Here are some supported by Certbot:

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$ certbot --help plugins
plugins:
Certbot client supports an extensible plugins architecture. See 'certbot
plugins' for a list of all installed plugins and their names. You can
force a particular plugin by setting options provided below. Running
--help will list flags specific to that plugin.
--apache Obtain and install certs using Apache (default: False)
--nginx Obtain and install certs using Nginx (default: False)
--standalone Obtain certs using a "standalone" webserver. (default:
False)
--manual Provide laborious manual instructions for obtaining a
cert (default: False)
--webroot Obtain certs by placing files in a webroot directory.
(default: False)

And there are also a number of third-party plugins, see the User Guide in Certbot Documentation. But there is none for GAE. It looks like there are only three possible options to try: standalone, webroot and manual.

Let’s start with the standalone method, and issue that from the local machine:

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$ sudo certbot certonly --standalone -d example.com

If you’re the first time running the command, you will be prompted for email and agreement screens. Both email and agreement can be automated via --email and --agree-tos options. That’s the automated part.

After freeing up the ports 80 and 443, run into some issues:

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Failed authorization procedure. example.com (tls-sni-01): urn:acme:error:connection
:: The server could not connect to the client to verify the domain :: Failed to
connect to 0.0.0.0:443 for TLS-SNI-01 challenge, example.com (tls-sni-01):
urn:acme:error:connection :: The server could not connect to the client to verify the
domain :: Failed to connect to 0.0.0.0:443 for TLS-SNI-01 challenge
IMPORTANT NOTES:
- The following errors were reported by the server:
Domain: example.com
Type: connection
Detail: Failed to connect to 0.0.0.0:443 for TLS-SNI-01
challenge
To fix these errors, please make sure that your domain name was
entered correctly and the DNS A record(s) for that domain
contain(s) the right IP address. Additionally, please check that
your computer has a publicly routable IP address and that no
firewalls are preventing the server from communicating with the
client. If you're using the webroot plugin, you should also verify
that you are serving files from the webroot path you provided.

The standalone plugin runs its own simple web server to prove that you control the domain. Ownership or domain validation is the key here. It needs the current computer that just issued the certbot command to have a publicly routable IP address. That’s not going to be happening in my local computer behind NAT. And webroot plugin needs a running web server. It can’t be run from the local machine as well. Domain validation are done automatically with both standalone and webroot plugins. Furthermore, domain validation requests are coming from Let’s Encrypt servers, therefore, you can’t have the machine issuing the certificate request behind a NAT or load balancing methods without properly routing the requests.

Since automated methods mostly require the requester and domain owner to be residing on the same machine, we can try to move the request to the Google cloud. Otherwise, there is one more plugin to try, the manual plugin. The manual method (plugin) helps you obtain a cert by giving you instructions to perform domain validation yourself.

Installing Let's Encrypt Certbot 0.8.x on Debian Jessie

Let’s Encrypt is a free, open, and automated certificate authority. And its Certbot is “a fully-featured, extensible client for the Let’s Encrypt CA (or any other CA that speaks the ACME protocol) that can automate the tasks of obtaining certificates and configuring webservers to use them.”[^1]

There are a number of ways to obtain and install SSL certificates issued by Let’s Encrypt CA. This is about installing Certbot 0.8.0 release on Debian Jessie. But before continuing, a few things to think about:

The Let’s Encrypt Client (Certbot) presently only runs on Unix-ish OSes that include Python 2.6 or 2.7; Python 3.x support will hopefully be added in the future. … currently it supports modern OSes based on Debian, Fedora, SUSE, Gentoo and Darwin.[^1]

That’s why using Docker container installation method might be a better choice, because it does not mess up your existing libraries and it can use supported operating systems which might not be the one you are using.

Anyhow, the current installation settings are:

  • Debian 8.5 Jessie
  • Python 2.7.9
  • Certbot 0.8.0

Certbot is available for Debian Jessie via backports.

Backports are recompiled packages from testing (mostly) and unstable (in a few cases only, e.g. security updates) in a stable environment so that they will run without new libraries (whenever it is possible) on a Debian stable distribution.

Backports cannot be tested as extensively as Debian stable, and backports are provided on an as-is basis, with risk of incompatibilities with other components in Debian stable. Use with care!

It is therefore recommended to select single backported packages that fit your needs, and not use all available backports.

Again, there’s why it might be a better idea to use a container. But, let’s proceed.

Add a new file named backports.list to /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ directory:

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$ sudo bash -c 'echo "deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian jessie-backports main" > \
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/backports.list'

Update:

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$ sudo apt-get update

All backports are deactivated by default, therefore, to install Certbot package from backports, run:

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$ sudo apt-get install certbot -t jessie-backports
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
The following extra packages will be installed:
dialog python-acme python-certbot python-cffi-backend python-configargparse python-configobj python-cryptography
python-dialog python-enum34 python-funcsigs python-idna python-ipaddress python-mock python-ndg-httpsclient python-openssl
python-parsedatetime python-pbr python-psutil python-pyasn1 python-pyicu python-requests python-rfc3339 python-six
python-tz python-urllib3 python-zope.component python-zope.event python-zope.interface
Suggested packages:
python-certbot-apache python-certbot-doc python-acme-doc python-configobj-doc python-cryptography-doc
python-cryptography-vectors python-enum34-doc python-funcsigs-doc python-mock-doc python-openssl-doc python-openssl-dbg
python-psutil-doc doc-base python-ntlm
Recommended packages:
letsencrypt
The following NEW packages will be installed:
certbot dialog python-acme python-certbot python-cffi-backend python-configargparse python-configobj python-cryptography
python-dialog python-enum34 python-funcsigs python-idna python-ipaddress python-mock python-ndg-httpsclient python-openssl
python-parsedatetime python-pbr python-psutil python-pyasn1 python-pyicu python-requests python-rfc3339 python-tz
python-urllib3 python-zope.component python-zope.event python-zope.interface
The following packages will be upgraded:
python-six
1 upgraded, 28 newly installed, 0 to remove and 163 not upgraded.
Need to get 1,881 kB of archives.
After this operation, 10.5 MB of additional disk space will be used.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

APT option -t lets you have simple control over which distribution packages will be retrieved from. In this case, the distribution jessie-backports is used.

Interesting to know that there is letsencrypt package, could this be the old client? Let’s query the APT’s package cache:

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$ apt-cache show letsencrypt
Package: letsencrypt
Source: python-certbot
Version: 0.8.0-1~bpo8+2
Installed-Size: 29
Maintainer: Debian Let's Encrypt
Architecture: all
Depends: certbot
Description-en: transitional dummy package
This is a transitional dummy package for the rename of letsencrypt to certbot.
It can safely be removed.

Yes, it’s a dummy package. It has been renamed. And from the documentation:

Until May 2016, Certbot was named simply letsencrypt or letsencrypt-auto, depending on install method.[^1]

Let’s poke around on the installed package:

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$ certbot --version
certbot 0.8.0

It’s not yet 1.0.

Obtaining the quick help:

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$ certbot --help
certbot [SUBCOMMAND] [options] [-d domain] [-d domain] ...
Certbot can obtain and install HTTPS/TLS/SSL certificates. By default,
it will attempt to use a webserver both for obtaining and installing the
cert. Major SUBCOMMANDS are:
(default) run Obtain & install a cert in your current webserver
certonly Obtain cert, but do not install it (aka "auth")
install Install a previously obtained cert in a server
renew Renew previously obtained certs that are near expiry
revoke Revoke a previously obtained certificate
register Perform tasks related to registering with the CA
rollback Rollback server configuration changes made during install
config_changes Show changes made to server config during installation
plugins Display information about installed plugins
Choice of server plugins for obtaining and installing cert:
(the apache plugin is not installed)
--standalone Run a standalone webserver for authentication
(nginx support is experimental, buggy, and not installed by default)
--webroot Place files in a server's webroot folder for authentication
OR use different plugins to obtain (authenticate) the cert and then install it:
--authenticator standalone --installer apache
More detailed help:
-h, --help [topic] print this message, or detailed help on a topic;
the available topics are:
all, automation, paths, security, testing, or any of the subcommands or
plugins (certonly, install, register, nginx, apache, standalone, webroot,
etc.)

Now it’s time to obtain the certificate.

[^1]: Certbot Documentation

Randomizing an Array with Sort

How to randomize an array? Use the sort command, with the option:

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-R, --random-sort
sort by random hash of keys

For example:

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$ seq 1 10 | sort -R
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$ seq 1 10 | sort --random-sort
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Listing Tags in Natural Sort of Version Numbers

Using the Node.js repository as an example:

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$ git remote -v
origin https://github.com/nodejs/node.git (fetch)
origin https://github.com/nodejs/node.git (push)

If we would like to list all tags with v0.12 versions, we could do:

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$ git tag -l 'v0.12.*'
v0.12.0
v0.12.1
v0.12.10
v0.12.11
v0.12.12
v0.12.13
v0.12.14
v0.12.15
v0.12.2
v0.12.3
v0.12.4
v0.12.5
v0.12.6
v0.12.7
v0.12.8
v0.12.8-rc.1
v0.12.9

However, v0.12.2 should come after v0.12.1.

To fix it, we use the sort command with option:

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-V, --version-sort
natural sort of (version) numbers within text

Thus:

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$ git tag -l 'v0.12.*' | sort --version-sort
v0.12.0
v0.12.1
v0.12.2
v0.12.3
v0.12.4
v0.12.5
v0.12.6
v0.12.7
v0.12.8
v0.12.8-rc.1
v0.12.9
v0.12.10
v0.12.11
v0.12.12
v0.12.13
v0.12.14
v0.12.15